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All databases related to - "Adam Matthew Digital"Results: 20
The full-text materials in this collection cover 11 broad areas related to Native Americans from the time prior to North American colonization to the 20th century Rights Movement. Areas covered, related to indigenous peoples of the U.S., Canada, and Mexico, include culture, history, education, religion, government relations, treaties, wars, trade, and 20th century political activism, among others. The primary source documents in this collection includes maps, atlases, visual images, art, photographs, linguistic and ethnographic accounts, 20th century American Indian newspapers, and more drawn from the Ayers Collection at the Newberry Library. Cross-searchable with the Library's subscription to The American West collection.
American Indian Newspapers is an archival collection of 45 print newspapers from Indigenous peoples of the United States and Canada from 1828-2016. It includes national newspapers as well as local community news and student publications. Among the 45 titles are a number of bilingual and Indigenous-language editions, such as Hawaiian, Cherokee, and Diné languages. The newspapers included in this resource have been sourced from the Newberry Library and the Sequoyah National Research Centre at the University of Arkansas, Little Rock.
This collection presents full text manuscript material relating to the activities and observations of British and American diplomats, missionaries, business people and tourists in China from 1793 to 1980, together with rare periodicals, paintings, maps, photographs and drawings. The resources have been indexed to provide ready accessibility for users by person, place and subject. An interactive map encourages searches by city and region.
The Confidential Print series, issued by the British Government between c. 1820 and 1970, originated out of a need to preserve the most important papers generated by the Foreign and Colonial Offices. These range from single-page letters or telegrams to comprehensive dispatches, investigative reports, and texts of treaties. All items marked 'Confidential Print' were printed and circulated immediately to leading officials in the Foreign Office, to the Cabinet and to heads of British missions abroad. This collection consists of the Confidential Print for Central and South America and the French- and the Spanish-speaking Caribbean. Topics covered include slavery and the slave trade, immigration, relations with indigenous peoples, wars and territorial disputes, the fall of the Brazilian monarchy, British business and financial interests, industrial development, the building of the Panama Canal, and the rise to power of rulers such as Perón in Argentina and Vargas in Brazil.
A full text, searchable collection of historical documents from the UK National Archives. Covers such important events as the 19th century Egyptian reforms of Muhammad Ali Pasha, the Middle East Conference of 1921, the Suez Crisis in 1956, the partition of Palestine, post-Suez Western foreign policy, and the Arab-Israeli conflict. Contents include letters, telegrams, dispatches describing important personalities or economic analysis, and large volumes, or texts of treaties. All items originally marked 'Confidential Print' were printed and circulated immediately to leading officials in the Foreign Office, to the Cabinet, and to heads of British missions abroad.
Defining Gender, subtitled "Five Centuries of Advice Literature Online," includes primary sources from the Bodleian Library, including ephemeral material such as ballads, cartoons, pamphlets, diaries, advice literature, medical journals, conduct books, and periodicals.
A rich resource for the study of all aspects of the eighteenth century, including the American and French revolutions, British and European literature, theatre and popular entertainment, politics and religion, popular morality and social life, and exoticism and imperialism. It offers a wide variety of fully searchable newspapers and periodicals unavailable elsewhere.
The original documents in this collection related to Empire Studies span five centuries and chart the rise and fall of empires, including the history of British imperialism and colonization. Topics range from the explorations of Columbus, Captain Cook, and others through decolonization in the second half of the twentieth century and debates over American imperialism. Documents include manuscripts, rare printed materials, periodicals, diaries, letters, and photographs with writings by both women and men from European and non-European perspectives. Useful secondary materials include essays from leading academics in the field, interactive maps, images, and chronologies detailing cultural, economic, and political aspects of numerous empires.
This collection addresses all aspects of women's lives in 19th Century America. Primary source contents include books, pamphlets, periodicals and broadsides (writings distributed on a single sheet of paper).
Collection of World War I primary sources including diaries, scrapbooks, propaganda pieces, trench and soldiers' journals, photos, correspondence, oral histories, sketches, paintings, cartoons, pamphlets, and sheet music. Resources are complemented by contextual secondary features, including interactive maps, chronologies, and scholarly essays. The Personal Experiences module offers a window on the lives and experiences of civilian and military men and women during the war the Propaganda and Recruitment module contains written and visual propaganda materials; and the Visual Perspectives and Narratives module presents international perspectives on the Great War through visual and documentary resources.
Sourced from the British Foreign Office files, this resource covers the political and social history of India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan in this period with additional content on Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, Sikkim and Kashmir, as well as other frontier regions. The threat posed by China and the Soviet Union is analyzed in detail. Other files look at the impact on The United Kingdom, U.S. and European trade, foreign relations, industrial policy, education and the media. Primary sources include diplomatic dispatches, telegrams, newspaper cuttings and transcripts, maps, photographs, political and economic reports, meeting minutes, conference proceedings, letters, and other ephemera. The Library has access to the first of the three sections in the database: Independence, Partition and the Nehru Era, 1947-1964.
Global Commodities provides visual, manuscript and printed materials from key libraries, companies and trade organizations around the world. These original sources record the history of fifteen major commodities (Chocolate, Coffee, Cotton, Fur, Opium, Oil, Porcelain, Silver and Gold, Spices, Sugar, Tea, Timber, Tobacco, Wheat, Wine, and Spirits) that have changed the world.
This archive of the J. Walter Thompson Company documents the history, operation, policies, and accomplishments of one of the world's largest and oldest advertising firms from 1900-2000. It contains materials on the research and creative processes behind the creation of advertisements, including many well-known brands. Content includes market reports (such as Cigarettes: Their Role and Function) and insights into the creation of advertisements for a multitude of brands, from conception to final publication.
Provides access to documents from the highest level of U.K. government during the administration of Prime Minister Harold Macmillan.
Provides insight into the American consumer boom of the mid-20th century through access to the complete market research reports of Ernest Dichter, the era’s foremost consumer analyst, market research pioneer and widely-recognized ‘father’ of Motivational Research.
This resource explores the dynamic period of social, political, and cultural change between 1950 and 1975. Encompassing music, society, art, and politics, and more, the collection offers thousands of color images of manuscript and rare printed material, as well as photographs, ephemera, videos, memorabilia, accompanying scholar essays, and a chronology of the era.
Explore three pivotal decades (the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s) in the struggle for civil rights in America through the eyes and work of sociologists, activists, psychologists, teachers, ministers, students and housewives. Sourced from the records of the Race Relations Department of the United Church Board for Homeland Ministries, housed at the Amistad Research Center in New Orleans, this resource provides access to a wealth of documents highlighting different responses to the challenges of overcoming prejudice, segregation and racial tensions. These range from survey material, including interviews and statistics, to educational pamphlets, administrative correspondence, and photographs and speeches from the Annual Race Relations Institutes.
Showcases rare and unique prompt books from the world-famous Folger Shakespeare Library. These prompt books tell the story of Shakespeare’s plays as they were performed in theatres throughout Great Britain, the United States and internationally, between the seventeenth and twentieth centuries.
Designed as a portal for trans-Atlantic slavery and abolition studies between 1490 and 2007, with original manuscripts, pamphlets, books, maps, images, and more. Close attention is paid to the varieties of slavery, the legacy of slavery, the social-justice perspective, and the continued existence of slavery today. Documents are presented alongside contextual essays contributed by leading academics in the field. Topics covered include the African Coast, the Middle Passage, and the varieties of slave experience, and includes case studies from America, the Caribbean, Brazil, and Cuba.
The footage in this collection documents the communist world from the Russian Revolution until the 1980s. Sourced from the British Film Institute (BFI), the documentaries, newsreels, and feature films reveal the world as seen by Soviet, Chinese, Vietnamese, East European, and Latin American filmmakers of the time. Content covers all aspects of socialist life from society, war, culture, the Cold War, memory of the past, and contemporaneous views on current affairs.

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